Other Stuff - Anything But Football

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Sam

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First used 09/07/10
15359 posts

#1 07/07/2018 at 09:11

If the government wanted to order £1m of £5 notes, how much would the company which makes them charge? 

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The Mouse That Roared

First used 21/07/15
3936 posts

#2 07/07/2018 at 10:03

If the government wanted to order £1m of £5 notes, how much would the company which makes them charge?
Sam, 07/07/2018 at 09:11


A mint. 

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DPCSF

First used 31/05/11
13106 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#3 07/07/2018 at 10:39

Do they pay em in fivers? 

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Sam

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First used 09/07/10
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#4 07/07/2018 at 10:59

How much does it cost to make a £5 note though?

Say it’s 10p a note. Does that make the value of the note 10p or £5? 

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DPCSF

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13106 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#5 07/07/2018 at 11:03

Have you got any to sell? 

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Sam

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First used 09/07/10
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#6 07/07/2018 at 11:26

Got a £1m worry. How much are you offering? 

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Rob Burch’s Lurchers

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First used 28/06/18
209 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#7 07/07/2018 at 14:26

A note doesn’t actually hold value does it? Isn’t it a “promise to pay” that is recouped by the bearer of it handing it into their bank? There’s some weird logic to it I’m sure I read that somewhere. 

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Andyben

First used 07/08/09
10880 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#8 07/07/2018 at 14:27

It's all about trust, post gold standard. 

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tylluan

First used 09/08/09
3777 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#9 07/07/2018 at 14:58

I was always told as a kid that those pieces of paper I'm out wallets are just promissory notes, Bank of England 'markers' if you like, and it's based on the hope that we don't all turn up to cash them in for gold

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Sam

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First used 09/07/10
15359 posts

#10 07/07/2018 at 16:00

A note doesn’t actually hold value does it? Isn’t it a “promise to pay” that is recouped by the bearer of it handing it into their bank? There’s some weird logic to it I’m sure I read that somewhere.
Matti, 07/07/2018 at 14:26



It's all about trust, post gold standard.
Andyben, 07/07/2018 at 14:27



I was always told as a kid that those pieces of paper I'm out wallets are just promissory notes, Bank of England 'markers' if you like, and it's based on the hope that we don't all turn up to cash them in for gold
tylluan, 07/07/2018 at 14:58


So how much is each note worth?

As per OP question; how much would it cost for £1m worth of fivers? 

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Andyben

First used 07/08/09
10880 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#11 07/07/2018 at 16:57

There's two costs.

1) the invoice from the goods (the 200,000 pieces of plastic) and
2) the corresponding entry to putting those notes into circulation  

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Sam

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First used 09/07/10
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#12 07/07/2018 at 17:01

Yeah, but, how much? 

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DPCSF

First used 31/05/11
13106 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#13 07/07/2018 at 17:38

Diane Abbot knows  

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The Mouse That Roared

First used 21/07/15
3936 posts

#14 07/07/2018 at 17:57

Yeah, but, how much?
Sam, 07/07/2018 at 17:01


Less and less. 

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Skamp

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First used 27/07/09
15856 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#15 07/07/2018 at 18:00

The government aren't responsible for printing money.

If they want £1m of £5 notes it would cost £1m (not the five million you're hoping folk will fall into)

If the BOE want to release a further £1m of fivers, good luck to them as long as they have £1m in their cashiers' desks upon demand and they have enough reserves of gold to cover it.  

35 posts. < 1 2 3 > Show 15 30 50

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