Other Stuff - Anything But Football

278 posts. < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > Show 15 30 50 60

NewBack To Top

tylluan

First used 09/08/09
5244 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#31 06/01/2021 at 20:07

Bradders it took me that long to write that rant I didn't notice you'd replied to my driver post

On the driver front, can't we just offer the dual nationality drivers more money to drive on GB plates 

NewBack To Top

Bradders23

johnny-cash-135-1.jpg

First used 17/08/09
4408 posts

#32 06/01/2021 at 20:10

Bradders it took me that long to write that rant I didn't notice you'd replied to my driver post

On the driver front, can't we just offer the dual nationality drivers more money to drive on GB plates
tylluan, 06/01/2021 at 20:07

How many of them are there? How many permits? And what would they cost versus the EU driver who comes over here with a full load, drops off, does a few inter GB drops then heads back to EU (probably empty but a load is a bonus).?

Sorry, I've just got to add to this... you can get 10,000 lorries through Dover in one day, that's just one port, albeit the biggest. It's impossible that the UK can pick up that slack, but being realistic we won't lose every EU driver coming in, even when compliance to the new regs kicks in. But what we do lose can't be picked up in other ways. That's why when Raab said as a Minister that he didn't appreciate how important Dover/Calais was to supply chains he should have been sacked immediately for incompetence.  

Post edited on 06/01/2021 at 20:15 by Bradders23

Of course there are cracks, that's how the light gets in. 

NewBack To Top

CDLF

new-kit-4x3138-1744177_478x359.jpg

First used 07/08/09
15037 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#33 07/01/2021 at 11:48


How many of them are there? How many permits? And what would they cost versus the EU driver who comes over here with a full load, drops off, does a few inter GB drops then heads back to EU (probably empty but a load is a bonus).?

Sorry, I've just got to add to this... you can get 10,000 lorries through Dover in one day, that's just one port, albeit the biggest. It's impossible that the UK can pick up that slack, but being realistic we won't lose every EU driver coming in, even when compliance to the new regs kicks in. But what we do lose can't be picked up in other ways. That's why when Raab said as a Minister that he didn't appreciate how important Dover/Calais was to supply chains he should have been sacked immediately for incompetence. being a Tory?
Bradders23, 06/01/2021 at 20:10

NewBack To Top

Baresi

First used 07/08/09
11537 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#34 07/01/2021 at 17:15

In the end, he couldn’t help himself. Emmanuel Macron just had to mention Brexit in his traditional television New Year address to the nation. It was “born of many lies and false promises”, he said. Yes, Britons would remain “our neighbours, friends and allies”, but France’s sovereignty lay “in Europe”. In 2020, we had “protected our interests, our industries, our fishermen and our European unity”.

Macron faces an uphill re-election campaign a year from now. The youngest president of the French Republic ever, the first to wave as many blue-and-gold EU flags as tricolours during his victorious 2017 campaign, he got the top job because he looked different from all the tired political warhorses from either side. But Macron has now lost his mojo: to gilets jaunes protests, pensions reform unrest and, finally, to Covid.

Each time, he was, with some reason, accused of being elitist, out of touch, contemptuous of the common people. He believes even more European integration will save both France and his bacon (he doesn’t really see a difference). And increasingly, both his technocratic inclination and political calculations push him to Britain-bashing. Hence his vindictiveness in the last days before Boris Johnson’s Christmas deal, including the closure of the border.

At the last minute, EU Commission president Ursula von der Leyen had to take over the brunt of the negotiation, to prevent the no-deal the French professed to “prefer to a bad deal”. This outlook is largely due to the smug anti-British sentiment that has prevailed since the 2016 referendum among the French chattering classes, Macron’s natural habitat.

I remember, barely a week after the Leave victory, attending a public conference of Paris Europlace, the body representing the bulk of French financial institutions, most of which are headed and peopled by the exact type of technocrat embodied by Macron. “We shall feast on the carcass of the City of London,” the Europlace then-president announced, to near-universal glee in the audience. The general attitude was “kick the Brits out, don’t yield an inch, they never were Europeans at heart”.

Over the past four and a half years, I have taken part in scores of French television debates, and the tone never varied. The notion of a choice motivated by a desire for political sovereignty was always pooh-poohed. Brexit was only ever a trick perpetrated to satisfy Boris’s naked ambition; a cruel joke played by an Eton-educated cynic and his cohorts.

As it happens, I’ve always seen Brexit as a bit of an own goal. It seemed to me that when you’re the second or third-largest economy in the bloc, you can push things your way from the inside. I also saw the benefit of having a truly free-trading country, which also happened to be France’s only serious military partner, in the EU mix. But for the first time since this all started I’ve become so angry with the EU (and with my own country ’s leaders ) that my heart now supports the Brexiteers.

After one too many TV debates when, just because I tried to explain the Leavers’ motivations, I got talked down by assorted representatives of the European establishment, each more dismissive and self-satisfied than the other, the current omnishambles of the EU’s health policy power grab was the last straw.

Health remains broadly outside the purview of the EU – or at least it does for now. The collective purchasing of vaccines by the 27 was intended to show how much more efficient the EU would be than individual nations. But, as was superbly uncovered by the German news magazine Der Spiegel, this was one case of mission creep too far. While Britain started to vaccinate in droves, the EU’s vaccination campaign was delayed for weeks because they chose to buy from six suppliers equal amounts of doses even though three of those – national champions like France’s Sanofi – are years away from producing a vaccine.

Germany’s excellent health minister, Jens Spahn, eventually forced his government to buy separately tens of millions of Pfizer vaccine doses. I’m afraid we French went the opposite way. Our Vaccination Czar was wheeled out to say that it was an excellent thing that the process was so slow – just as back in March we were told that we didn’t need masks because we had none available – because the logistics chain for the Pfizer vaccine was not fit for purpose.

In both cases, we have needed the EU like a fish needs a bicycle. British friends, you were right all along.
Andyben, 06/01/2021 at 16:12


Would be helpful to know who wrote that... 

I ask you will Galway bate Mayo? Not if they have Willie Joe...they haven't a hope of beating Mayo! 

NewBack To Top

AndyBen

First used 07/08/09
13629 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#35 07/01/2021 at 22:08

Some french political journalist living in france as a french voter.

Obviouly not as keyed into French politics as Owen Jones, or a middled aged man in Sheffield

Anne-Elisabeth Moutet 

Post edited on 07/01/2021 at 22:11 by 

NewBack To Top

AndyBen

First used 07/08/09
13629 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#36 07/01/2021 at 22:14

NewBack To Top

bartos1976

FullSizeRender-1.jpg

First used 19/02/12
10352 posts

#37 08/01/2021 at 09:00

NewBack To Top

AndyBen

First used 07/08/09
13629 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#38 08/01/2021 at 13:18

Err looks like it's the EU suffering from that, not UK 

NewBack To Top

Owling_Wolf

1364942127133925.jpg

First used 31/07/09
42361 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#39 08/01/2021 at 13:37

Err looks like it's the EU suffering from that, not UK
Andyben, 08/01/2021 at 13:18

How so, Bendy? It's an article about UK firms or UK based 'world companies' distribution centres worrying about losing their export markets.
Later on it's an explanation by hauliers about the problems they are experiencing with additional paperwork and beaurocracy affecting their ability to carry stuff into the EU.
Obviously the latter situation is likely to improve with experience of what's necessary but how many foxes might have bolted elsewhere by then?
Speaking personally, I remember all this "red tape" last time around and the celebrations nationwide when it was finally got rid of / vastly simplified when we were eventually let in by the forerunner of the EU. Who'd have thought then that we'd later cause it to return? 

We must not give opposition teams hope. We have to kill them. 

NewBack To Top

Skamp

swfc3.jpg

First used 27/07/09
17405 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#40 08/01/2021 at 13:48

Chip paper in a couple of months when it's all running as it should with import/ export documents completed electronically and notified in advance to the ports.

When haulage companies are producing their manifest or bill of laden documents it's a simple tweak to produce these documents.

Like any change it takes a little while to settle in but it suits half the c**ts at the BBC to make a meal of it and probably at the RHA as well.

Get over it and get in with it. There's money to be earned by getting your act together as it will give you a competitive edge.  

Post edited on 08/01/2021 at 13:49 by Skamp

NewBack To Top

bartos1976

FullSizeRender-1.jpg

First used 19/02/12
10352 posts

#41 08/01/2021 at 14:48


How so, Bendy? It's an article about UK firms or UK based 'world companies' distribution centres worrying about losing their export markets.
Owling_Wolf, 08/01/2021 at 13:37


Exactly 

NewBack To Top

Bradders23

johnny-cash-135-1.jpg

First used 17/08/09
4408 posts

#42 08/01/2021 at 15:57

Fuck sake I've just written a really long post about the state of the ferry and freight industries and lost the lot as I went to post. I refuse to type the lot out again so you get the very short summary:

I've been watching the ferry industry media outputs this week, Holyhead is the second largest port in the UK and has cut sailings due to supply chain problems. Dover is really quiet, appr 2000 trucks a day compared to 6-7000 usually at this time of year but still there are long delays.

Massive issues for freight companies around paperwork, delays and groupage issues, freight costs going up by 30% .

As freight starts to get back to near-ish normal levels, it's going to get worse. That's the summary Smile

 

Of course there are cracks, that's how the light gets in. 

NewBack To Top

TommyCraig6

First used 28/08/09
5350 posts

#43 08/01/2021 at 16:22

Chip paper in a couple of months when it's all running as it should with import/ export documents completed electronically and notified in advance to the ports.

When haulage companies are producing their manifest or bill of laden documents it's a simple tweak to produce these documents.

Like any change it takes a little while to settle in but it suits half the c**ts at the BBC to make a meal of it and probably at the RHA as well.

Get over it and get in with it. There's money to be earned by getting your act together as it will give you a competitive edge.
Skamp, 08/01/2021 at 13:48


Oh yes, the lefties at the BBC. New chairman Tory donor. You aren't bothered if it's right leaning. I suppose you'll think it's impartial
now! 

NewBack To Top

TommyCraig6

First used 28/08/09
5350 posts

#44 08/01/2021 at 16:24

Fuck sake I've just written a really long post about the state of the ferry and freight industries and lost the lot as I went to post. I refuse to type the lot out again so you get the very short summary:

I've been watching the ferry industry media outputs this week, Holyhead is the second largest port in the UK and has cut sailings due to supply chain problems. Dover is really quiet, appr 2000 trucks a day compared to 6-7000 usually at this time of year but still there are long delays.

Massive issues for freight companies around paperwork, delays and groupage issues, freight costs going up by 30% .

As freight starts to get back to near-ish normal levels, it's going to get worse. That's the summary Smile

Bradders23, 08/01/2021 at 15:57


A bloody shambles.  

NewBack To Top

Skamp

swfc3.jpg

First used 27/07/09
17405 posts

Sheffield Wednesday
#45 08/01/2021 at 16:28

With the doom being predicted and my let's give it a couple of months, instead of us surmising let's wait and see. We can revisit this thread at the beginning of April.

I'm very much reminded of the Y2K doom and gloom merchants right now.  

278 posts. < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > Show 15 30 50 60

Do you want your opinion heard? Get involved with Owlsonline by emailing us at admin@owlsonline.com